Historical Fiction. A lot of people do not like this genre because they do not consider it “real” history. I quite enjoy it because I read a tremendous amount of “real” history every day for my work and personal growth. Sometimes it is nice to get lost in a historical fiction book, even if it is WWII based, and be exposed to new ideas. I appreciate it when the author does her or his homework and provides a bibliography or additional titles within their Author Notes. I know I am not the only person who explores things they had not heard of because they read about it in a historical fiction book.

The Paris Orphan by Natasha Lester

I read The Paris Orphan on Thanksgiving. It’s almost 450 pages and I could not put it down. I even stayed up late to finish it because I had to know how it ended, even though I had an idea, though hoped I was wrong.

This book is historical fiction inspired by the life of female model and war correspondent and photographer, Lee Miller.

The main character Jessica May is a model for Vogue and a photographer, who chooses to join the war effort and has to deal with discrimination, rape, abuse from the men in the military, a desire to do more than “be a pretty face” or someone’s “sex doll”. The author brings in real-life female correspondents like Martha Gellhorn, Hemmingway’s wife, Lee Carson, Iris Carpenter, and others as she weaves her magic with words.

Jess, like all other women during the war, had to prove themselves over and over. To constantly beg or demand for the opportunity to do the job they were hired for. To go where women had not gone before and help men realize they were fully capable of doing so. Jess and her colleagues also had to deal with traumatizing topics of life and war.

Jess is confronted during the war with the issue of not only hearing the Russians went through and raped German women, but also knowing the American soldiers were doing the same to French, Belgian, Dutch, and German women. We would all like to think none of our soldiers/family members could have done this, but we might be surprised at just how many did if the truth came out. Jess debates writing an article about this after being unable to stop a rape from happening. In the end, to avoid being kicked out of her job, she opts to wait until the war is over to write this particular story. The author raises a question in her reading guide about whether or not this was cowardly or brave.

She also fights her own battle with her male superior officer who tries in every way to make her life a living hell. Sadly, he usually succeeded. She and the other female correspondents all have to deal with his ego and imagined superiority. I wonder how many of our female ancestors, whether in military service or who worked any job outside the home during the war, dealt with these issues and never spoke of them.

While I have done a lot of reading and research on women in WWII – WACs, WAVES, WAPS, Nurses, etc. and knew of the discrimination they were up against, knew the rumors men spread about them being “easy” or “sluts”, the sexual abuse some endured, and how they had to fight for every opportunity even when they could do it better than a man, I knew very little about female war correspondents. I have researched some male war correspondents and photographers and have some books about them. It wasn’t until I read this book that a whole new world of research opened up for me. Thankfully the author provided several books in her notes that I can read.

Why are these topics and this book important?

The more I read this book, the more I admired the women who came before me. The struggles, abuse, trauma, and other things they endured to provide new opportunities for women in the future. I also realized there are many topics I still need to learn more about. Also, as I read, I felt sad because we still have a long way to go in how we view, respect, and treat women.

In 2019, women are still, around the world, fighting for rights, equal pay, and to not be viewed as sex objects because men can’t always control themselves. We are still fighting to be seen as equals. We are still fighting to have our bodies protected and not be told by men what we can and can’t do or how we can or can’t operate our bodies, and who can and can’t touch us. I sometimes wonder, how far have we really come since WWII? Sometimes it does not feel as far as we think we have.

This book and it’s topics also made me wonder what stories are within my family, like Jess’ that were hidden. Jess ends up enduring terrible things during the war, things she keeps secret until almost her dying days. Things she felt would protect her family and those she loved. I’m aware of the abuse that runs through the female ancestors in my family and I wonder if we acknowledge it happened and can work on healing it – how much we can change the world and ourselves.

My Invitation To You

I invite you to explore the deeper, darker, secretive stories of your family. To see if it is possible to discuss these topics with older family members and find out what their experience was. Knowing these things may help you better understand why family members are or were the way they are. To better help you understand the blessings and burdens you carry through your DNA and lineage. I also invite you to write the stories about this for your family. This doesn’t mean you have to share publicly, but get them down on paper so they aren’t lost. There are many lessons to be learned and healing to be done if we are brave enough to start the conversation.

Author’s Suggested Books – Further Reading

These are a few books the author put in her Author’s Note at the end of the book. She also included a reading guide which makes this book a great book for book clubs.

  • The Woman War Correspondent, the U.S. Military, and The Press by Carolyn M. Edy.
  • No Woman’s World: From D-Day to Berlin, a Female Correspondent Covers World War II by Iris Carpenter.
  • The Women Who Wrote the War: The Complete Story of the Path-breaking Women Correspondents of World War II by Nancy Caldwell Sorel.
  • Lee Miller’s Way edited by Antony Penrose.
  • Lee miller: A Life by Carolyn Burke.
  • Martha Gellhorn: A Life by Carolyn Moorehead.
  • Women War Correspondents of World War II by Lilya Wagner
  • Women of the World by Julia Edwards.
  • Where the Action Was: Women War Correspondents in World War II by Penny Colman.

What Do You Think?

What do you think about these topics? Have you explored them within your own family history? How have you been able to move beyond and heal the trauma of the past?

Disclaimer: The book links are affiliate links to Amazon. This does not affect the price you pay. When you purchase using my link I make a small percentage of the sale.

© 2020 Ancestral Souls

Question 1 July 2020

How are your ancestors connecting with you the last month? Do they appear as symbols? Flowers, feathers, coins, songs, books? Do they appear visually to you?

What wisdom are they passing to you during this incredible transformative energy period since end of May?

 

Please comment below to share with others if you feel comfortable.

I also invite you to journal on this question on your own.

This class will change how you research and write!

Journey with Jennifer as your travel guide, through your family’s history, their military stories, and your own story. On this journey you will read a life-changing book.

Together with a core group of people, we will discuss issues and emotions around the themes of war, religion, women’s themes, spirituality, family, stories, trauma, inherited trauma, racism, LGBTQ, caregiver issues, secrets, shame, guilt, PTSD, and many other topics that come from the book, my questions, and your experiences.

You will explore your family’s history and dive into who you are with this knowledge. You will even begin to write your own stories.

Watch the video to learn more then scroll down to explore more details. To learn more about this seven-week course, visit the registration page to find full details and testimonials from past participants. If you have questions about this course, please contact Jennifer at info@wwiirwc.com. I can’t wait to work with you and guide you on your transformative journey! © 2020 Ancestral Souls

New ancestor training program

Are you ready to start transforming your life and healing the past? Ready to explore family patterns, energy healing, ancestral lineage healing, inherited trauma and more topics related to our ancestors and personal growth? If so, you are in the right place.

Learn more and explore all the topics we will cover the first year, plus bonus materials on the registration page.

Do you have questions about the membership program? Email Jennifer at info@wwiirwc.com to ask.

Please note: This is an introductory membership price structure. It will go up by January 2021. Lock in your fee by joining today!

© 2020 Ancestral Souls

We have made it to June 2020 and the world, especially America is pushing the dark into the light. This is making us all very uncomfortable. Unstable. Nervous. Scared. Pushing a lot of guilt, shame, doubt, anger, rage, hate, and other negative emotions to the surface. Some belong to us, some belong to our ancestors, others belong to the collective that we feel in our bodies, hearts,  and souls.

So what do we do with all this? How do we stay sane as the world is slowly deconstructed? All the things we believed were for our good are slowly being taken away. What will they be replaced with?

What energy are you primarily living in? Fear – which creates more of that in your universe? Doubt? Anger? Confusion? Grief? How are you exploring that and healing it?

In my new video I explore a huge realization I had last night – I am no longer ok with this life. I want out. I am no longer happy with the stories I’ve lived or tell and not happy with most of the characters, including the ones I’ve played.

When we reach that point, it is a step into complete freedom, which for most of the planet’s residents feels very scary. After watching my video – please share in the comments how you feel. What are you going through? How has your life and your ancestors’ lives or military histories affected how you process and deal with current events? I invite you to subscribe to my mailing list so you will receive more articles, resources, education, and tips on how to create your life in the new way this earth is being created.

 

Do you need support or resources?

I am here to help people explore their beliefs and shed old patterns. I have many ways to help you.

Explore my private facilitation session options.

Join my Genealogy Ancestral Lineage Healing Group.

Sign up for my newsletter & receive access to the free Finding the Answers Journey member area. Plus you will receive information about my soon to be released Ancestral Souls Healing Circle Membership. This will be a monthly membership in which we explore topics around personal and lineage healing.

Join my Roots & War Writing Group to start writing your stories.

© 2020 Ancestral Souls

There are so many ways to look at our genealogy and military family history in deeper ways than just compiling a family tree. The Genogram, a diagram outlining the history of the behavior patterns (as of divorce, abortion, or suicide) of a family over several generations, is one tool that can be useful to dive deeper into your past and also heal your present.

 

what does a genogram look like?

The best way to show you what a genogram looks like is to give you something interactive. View a short Genogram video depicting the Skywalker family from Star Wars.

how are genograms helpful?

Genograms can show us through various symbols showing relationships, births, marriages, deaths, patterns, and some biographical data, what is happening in a family at a point in time. Therapists use genograms to explore what a new client is dealing with at the time they start therapy. One nice thing about a genogram is it can be continually expanded as new information comes in or the therapy sessions continue.

So if this is a tool for therapists, why should family historians or those seeking to do self-healing use it? I use it because it shows the family patterns and issues we may not otherwise see. Sometimes a visual example is better than a story.

When I completed my genogram in December 2019, while reading the book Family Secrets by John Bradshaw, I was astounded and shocked that I was living pieces of my paternal grandparent’s lives. Not the blessing part of their lives but the burdens. Expanding this again in May 2020 I learned even more patterns I was carrying forward in my life and relationships, not only on the paternal side but the maternal side. John’s book helped me explore many aspects of my family history and he gives many examples of how family historians can use genograms in a simple way.

This knowledge created a turning point for me in which I had to choose to continue these patterns or allow them to surface and look at the dark side of my family and personal history. Look at the choices I’ve made unconsciously, that now I can bring to the conscious level and explore. What is working? What is not? What can I let go of or change? Do I still have to repeat negative or destructive patterns? It is all a choice.

 

Other uses of a genogram for self & family healing

Interestingly, this diagram can be used for so much more than behavioral patterns. We can map out the beliefs and patterns for an individual and family relating to the following topics. This information can help us explore our personal patterns and negative traits in relationship to different areas of our life. Looking at these areas can allow old patterns and inherited ancestral burdens to come out of the dark into the light to look at. Once we are able to look at these things, we can heal and release them so they not longer affect us or our ancestors or descendants.

  • Health history
  • Culture
  • Religion or Spirituality
  • Occupation
  • Ethnicity, Immigration, Migration
  • Business, Government, or other Institutional relationships
  • Play
  • Family Constellations

 

Would you like to explore this more?

Join my mailing list to be the first to hear about my new Ancestral Souls Healing Circle Membership, launching in June 2020. In this healing circle we will have monthly Zoom meetings to explore topics like this and other deeper genealogy and family pattern topics. When you join the mailing list you also get access to the free member’s area of Finding the Answers Journey, which is my course and webinar website.

Do you have questions or would you like to work with me? Email me at info@wwiirwc.com to discuss.

Disclosure – the book link is an affiliate link. I make a tiny percentage off the sale. This does not affect the price you pay.

© 2020 Ancestral Souls

For the last decade I’ve studied the deeper layers of genealogy and family history. Explored the darker sides of family and ancestors. Looked at the grief, loss, war, fear they lived with, safety issues that existed, survival instincts, PTSD, inherited trauma and other related topics.

Exploring those topics has helped me do my own healing and today I’d like to talk about our current lives and forced isolation alongside our ancestors’ lives where the issues of fear and safety arise. I will provide just a little information around this topic with resources for you to explore.

fear and safety in our ancestors’ lives

Tregler family in Bohemia

If you look back in your genealogy, you will find many instances where your ancestors were living in fear and were unsure of their personal safety perhaps due to war or famine, political conflicts, immigration, or natural disasters. Those situations may have been shorter term and affected the ancestors for a period of time. They may have learned to live with the new normal that came after. Some may have shoved their emotions and feelings about it all deep inside to carry the rest of their lives while others were able to heal.

In cases where abuse and rape occurred, those fear and safety issues may have lingered the rest of the ancestor’s life. It has only been in more recent times that we are allowed to talk about these things and start to heal.

In either case, we, the descendants of our ancestors, carry their pain, trauma, fear, and safety issues in our DNA.  It is stored in our bodies and within our energy system – the chakras. I can personally say that doing chakra energy healing can shift out a lot of things we carry that aren’t even ours and make a huge difference in how we live. I’ll save that for another article. It will shock you how much we carry that messes us up that isn’t even ours.

Differences between fear & safety then versus now

I think it’s important to acknowledge the farther back we go in our family history, the less 24/7/365 media programming/brainwashing was available. Today we have news stations and social media channels blasting fear and panic over toilet paper, a virus, lockdowns, vaccines, and food shortages and killer hornets, and every other disease and way to die has been cured because CDC says covid is the only way people are dying now (or is it?) all…day…long.

And the narrative keeps changing – have you noticed? We are slowly being programmed to be in fear and rely more on the government and start to fear things outside our homes. There is a quote that goes something like, I never thought I’d see people so afraid to die that they stopped living.

Have you noticed how much of the world has stopped living?

Would you have been so afraid of the virus if the media had not told you to be afraid? Especially when studies are coming out now that show us it is less deadly than the flu? That the majority of people dying are in nursing homes (which already had care issues?)

Have you noticed the media said there will be no toilet paper so everyone ran out to buy it? We’ll be locked in our homes for decades – so there was a run on food? We can’t open the country safely unless we have a vaccine (even though Fauci said in the Senate Hearing yesterday the vaccine may not work or create more issues for those with prior health issues) – even though there are therapeutics that work (see latest France and Italy studies and what’s coming out in America outside of mainstream media.)

Why were we never told to be afraid when H1N1 came out in 2009? How many of us were so sick with that flu and the country stayed open? No shortage on toilet paper or food… makes you question right?  I remember being sicker than I’d ever been with three kids ages 8 and 4 (twins) to take care of and the government didn’t shut down the world.

Now look at your ancestors…

Less media interference may have created fewer issues with fear and safety. When you examine the propaganda/news created for WWII to get families to buy into the war effort THEN look at the propaganda/news created for WWI (a generation prior) and THEN look at propaganda/news for the generation before that, what do you notice?  

  1. What kind of media did our ancestors have access to?
  2. Our parents? I’m 47 and my parents had access to TV, radio, magazines, and newspapers.
  3. My grandparents? TV (after WWII), radio, magazines, and newspapers.
  4. My great grandparents? Radio, magazines, newspapers. If they could read.
  5. My great great grandparents? Magazines, Newspapers, pamphlets (at least in the U.S. – in Europe I’m not sure as they were peasants and likely couldn’t read). Word of mouth news which as we know often is distored.

Start Asking questions

  1. What events did my ancestors go through that created fear?
  2. What events did my ancestors go through that created safety issues?
  3. How did my ancestors handle these events? (Did they ignore their emotions and push it down? Did they talk about it? Use faith/religion to see them through? Talk it out with a therapist or other healer?)
  4. How much have I bought into the fear propagated by the media and social media which is showing one side of the story?
  5. How am I handling this fear and concern over safety? Or am I content letting the governors take away my rights and force me to stay home where my finances are suffering, my health is suffering (mental and physical), my business may be suffering or I lose my job, my kids are suffering on many levels.
  6. What emotions and thoughts keep coming up for me throughout this lockdown? WHOSE thoughts and emotions are they? Mine or my ancestors? Mine or my friends?
  7. What fear or safety based issues keep coming up for me? Journal on this.
  8. What can I do to let go and release these thoughts and emotions that are not mine? Therapy, call a suicide prevention line, energy healing, chakra healing, journaling, exercise, etc.
These are only a few questions and areas to explore in your life and that of your ancestors’ lives. We are at a pivotal moment in history where we need to be exploring these issues and questions. To heal and release all those things that don’t serve us, but certainly mess up our lives. To ask more questions about the narrative being pushed on us all day long. To start LIVING again and making choices that align with our true heart and soul. Possibly the most important thing to start doing: Stop blaming everyone else for the choices you are making. You might read my other articles on these topics:

resources

These are a few resources you can explore to dip your toes into ancestral healing and personal healing. You may also ask to join my FB Group for more support.

Online Course Option

 

 

 


 

You can also explore Wendy DeRosa’s online course which will take you through some deep healing and possibly assist in removing some fears and safety issues. Register by 27 May 2020.

Every course I have taken with Wendy has transformed my life and removed layers of stuck energy, fears, abuse, trauma, emotion, and more. I highly recommend her course.

Disclaimer: The course and book links are affiliate links and I make a tiny percentage off the sale. This does not affect the price you pay.

© 2020 Ancestral souls

Are you ready to shift into a higher vibration with your client work?

Questions

Are you a genealogy or military research professional who needs support assisting clients in the processing of research results?

Are your clients asking for help to understand the emotional issues that may arise with DNA research results, results that indicate a family story or person is not who we thought they were? Results that show us a family member was a criminal, abusive, destructive, or damaged people or things in other ways?

Do you need help processing all the results you encounter as a professional? Especially if you work with a lot of death?

If so, I have two offers for you!

In January 2020 I taught a webinar on helping research professionals learn tools to help both themselves process research results and not go into depression or compassion fatigue AND to also help clients process information.

To assist you as a professional or hobby researcher to stay more mentally fit, I have two offers for you.

1. A free webinar.

While holding space and providing a safe, open environment, I will explore topics related to genealogy and military research results which may dramatically affect our clients and ourselves. These include: grief, loss, trauma, family secrets, family patterns, family parallels, caregiving, spirituality and religion, PTSD, racialized trauma, LGBTQI, genealogical topics, inherited trauma, and the effects of the war on families in addition to the veteran.

During the exploration you may become aware of how your research clients may need additional support and resources to help them process the information you provide to them. Additionally, you may become aware that you also need help to process the sometimes heavier, more emotional work we do, which takes a toll on us mentally, physically, spiritually and emotionally.

You will leave this webinar with a basic understanding of many topics which you can then explore to help you add a support component to your business.

Includes a workbook to help get you started on your new journey!

Register on the Finding the Answers Journey website.

2. Discount on 3 1-hour facilitation sessions.

Facilitation sessions are available to help you learn how to assist yourself or your clients in healthier ways. In these 1-1 sessions, we will discuss what you deal with in your business. What your needs are. What your clients’ needs are. Where you need help. I will provide tools to help you explore what works best for you.

Learn more about facilitation sessions on the Finding the Answers Journey website.

Use discount code: 3HRFACILITATIONAPR20 to secure your discount. This is a $75 off the 3 1-hour package only. Discount expires 30 April 2020.

© 2020 Ancestral Souls

 

 

 

Monday 2 November arrived and brought with it the last two days of my trip. I spent the day packing and writing before I drove to Amsterdam to check into my final hotel of the trip. That evening I was supposed to meet with DPAA, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. This was another meeting scheduled at the last minute prior to my trip. Someone who knew I was speaking at Groesbeek altered one of the DPAA WWII historians about me. After some emails and a phone conversation, I was going to meet Christine C. and her team in Amsterdam the day they flew over to the Netherlands to do whatever they planned to do.

I met the group for dinner and we had really great conversations about their work and mine. One important component was the topic of education. I feel strongly that people do not have enough information about the Graves Registration Service and their job during and after WWII. Nor do they have enough information about WHY bodies could not always be recovered or why it has taken 70+ years, in some cases to recover them. This will be the topic of a future article and will feature in Volume 4 of my book series in 2016. The meeting was great and who knows. There may be an opportunity to work together in the future.

Tuesday, 3 November brought mRijksmuseum Amsterdam (28)y final full day in the Netherlands. I felt as if I had done everything I was consciously and somehow, subconsciously, I was supposed to on the trip. I was at peace and ready to go home the next day.

I spent the day with a friend at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam and enjoyed the art, artifacts, and conversation. The museum was full of energy, a lot of it centered in rooms which held medieval period art and artifacts. Especially the weapons room where I wondered, how many ways can you kill a man?

That room brought up a lot of feelings and issues from the past and a lot of negative and heavy energy. Some of it was attached to my friend because I knew he and I went back lifetimes. I did a lot of clearing in that room around these issues coming up and the items in the room. A few tears fell in the process but in the end, it is what was necessary.

Jen 3 Nov 2015 (1)

Peaceful and ready to head home.

At the end of a great day I prepared to fly home the next morning, grateful for all the experiences I had, people I met, and ready for the next stage in life. Once I navigated my way through the airport and had breakfast and was waiting at the gate, I admit to a little happy dance that I had traveled alone. This was not something I thought I could do a year ago, but when the time is right, magic happens. I was certain that a three year period of working too much and solidifying the foundation of my ever changing business, was over and a new one was beginning. A period in life where it would not be all about work but some balance would arrive.

So what else happened on this trip? What led me to travel alone besides what I already talked about in these articles? And what happened on the first trip to Europe that changed everything? I guess you’ll have to wait for the book to come out!

© 2020 Ancestral Souls

 

 

1 November was one of my very favorite days of the trip. That morning I drove to Achtmaal, Netherlands to meet some of the Friends of the Timberwolves at the Achtmaal Museum. I met Esther, Adrie, Sjaan and Kevin, Peet, and Herman.Jeeps (6)

The day was perfect. Warm sun, a slight breeze, colorful fall leaves falling from the trees, and new friends. We met at the museum and after coffee and cookies with a history lesson thrown in, I had a tour. Time was short because we had a lot to see that day, so on my trip in May I will have to try to meet with the group again and see more of the museum. The museum houses not only Timberwolf artifacts but also artifacts from other groups who fought in the area.

Timbewolf museum Achtmaal (13)Timberwolf Tracks (62)Upon completion of the tour we hopped in two jeeps and took off through the countryside. Peet was my driver and also the man who gave me a history lesson over coffee. As we drove, he told me about the routes we took, where the fighting occurred and details about the men and war. We stopped at many sites to see where battles happened, including were my friend John Tyrrell was wounded.

It was very interesting to look at my photos and the little bit of video I shot while Peet was driving. There are a lot of red orbs in my photos. Soldiers watching and waiting. Protecting. Usually they don’t show up quite like that in my photos. But there they were!

Seeing the places battles were fought, or concentration camps where so many died, is high on my list of things to do when I visit Europe. What is difficult is trying to picture these now serene, often beautiful places through the eyes of someone who was there 70+ years ago. Trying to wrap my head around what happened there and then put that into words that explain it, is difficult. It is often unimaginable the horrors that took place in such a calm place where crops grow or sheep graze today. And everywhere we went, I could feel the presence of all the soldiers, regardless of side on which they fought, in those fields. In some areas, like the Battle Between the Dikes, the energy was so intense it rode in waves through me.

Timberwolf Tracks (32)

Friends of the Timberwolves having lunch
where a battle was once fought.

After visiting many places the Timberwolves fought, we stopped for lunch in an old building where I met Toine Vermunt, a local historian and author. Toine gave me a short history lesson after lunch before we departed the area. He showed me maps of Holland and explained where the Timberwolves were, what happened at the building we were having lunch in, and what we would see in the afternoon. The Battle Between the Dikes. Toine gave me a booklet in English, he wrote a few years ago explaining this battle. I am grateful to have this history.

Laying flowers at memorial (2)

Laying flowers at the memorial.

Toine rode with us to see the area where the Battle Between the Dikes took place, after first stopping to lay flowers at a Timberwolf Memorial. It was as if the Timberwolves were waiting for us because the energy at the memorial about dropped me to my knees.

Our next stop was at a woman’s home where we were allowed to walk behind and stand by the canal and look at the area where the men were fighting and attempting to cross. Another beautiful place where such horror occurred.

Battle of the Dikes area

Battle Between the Dikes

Driving through the areas where the Battle Between the Dikes was fought was intense. The energy from both sides argued with each other. The Allied soldiers were calmer and just wanted to go home. The German side was angry to the point I was feeling a bit nauseous for a while. I cannot count the number of times that day I said clearing statements to send people off into the light and transmute the energy.

As the afternoon began drawing to a close, our last stop was at the Basilica in Oudenbosch. We had about 15 minutes there because they were about to close. It is another place to which I must return. The Basilica is a small replica of St. Peter’s in Rome. Small does not do it justice as it feels gigantic and I felt very tiny in that beautiful place. I was able to light some candles for my soldiers and say some prayers before we left.

Timberwolf Tracks (87)The Basilica held a lot of energy also. It felt heavy as if every prayer, question, wish, hope, dream, despair, frustration, and death that ever was left in the building, remained. In a way I was happy to only have 15 minutes in that place. After such an intense day, any longer might have done me in.

After returning the jeeps to the Timberwolf HQ and saying goodbye to my new friend Adrie, the rest of us went out for dinner before I drove back to Ammerzoden, where I was staying for two weeks.

The day I spent with the Friends of the Timberwolves was one of my favorite days from this trip. It was incredible and moving to be surrounded by people with such passion for World War II and our soldiers. People who understood the soldiers still walk in the mists and live among the items in their museum. People who honor the memories of those who gave them their freedom. And, my absolute favorite part of the day – meeting Kevin who is a teenager and has the desire to preserve the stories of these men. It warms my heart to see young people wanting to be involved in this work. It provides the promise that when the older generation is gone and my generation is aging, there will still be someone sharing the stories and memories.

© 2020 Ancestral Souls